Lend a Robotic Hand: Baptist Health Launches Pilot Program for Robotic Team Member – The Resident Community News Group, Inc.

Michael A. Mayo, President and CEO of Baptist Health, and Tammy Daniel, Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer, discuss the many benefits of deploying a pair of Moxi robots in the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Tower Weaver. Photo by Michele Leivas.

Last month, Baptist Health introduced Moxi, the robot – its newest support member for its clinical teams.

Moxi is “smart, dedicated to her job, has expressive eyes, and is happy to pose for selfies,” according to a press release from Baptist Health.

Moxi was unveiled at a media event and demo on Tuesday, October 4.

The press release explained that the “point-to-point” robot would support clinical teams by performing time-consuming tasks that often take nurses away from their unit, including retrieving and delivering lab samples, medications, personal protection (PPE), light medical equipment. equipment and objects left at reception for patients.

“What does [team members] it’s those extra steps they take to go get those errands, go to the pharmacy, go to dietetics and get those things,” said Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer Tammy Daniel. “Moxi will do this for them so they can stand on the unit and attend to patients instead of running errands. It’s exciting for them to be able to do the things they really love to do and to know that Baptist is trying to help them do their jobs better.

Baptist Health Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer Tammy Daniel discusses an eight-month pilot program in which Baptist Health will collect data and extrapolate it to calculate how much time Moxi will save nurses and other members of the team.  Photo by Michele Leivas.
Baptist Health Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer Tammy Daniel discusses an eight-month pilot program in which Baptist Health will collect data and extrapolate it to calculate how much time Moxi will save nurses and other members of the team. Photo by Michele Leivas.

Baptist Health is the first health system in the state to introduce Moxi to its teams. It will run an eight-month pilot program deploying a pair of Moxi robots in its J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver tower.

“We will take all the data we collect from the pilot to see if there are additional use cases we can use,” Daniel explained after demoing the robot early last month. “We’ll take that data and extrapolate it over a period of a year to see how much time it will save our clinical team, and then hopefully use it full-time.”

Moxi is the product of Diligent Robotics, Inc., an Austin-based artificial intelligence company “creating assistant robots that help healthcare workers with routine tasks so they can focus on what they’re doing. best: patient care”. Gregg Springan, IT manager and himself a nurse, said it took “less than three months” from the start of conversations with Baptist Health to the delivery of Moxi. No new or additional hardware or infrastructure was required from Baptist Health to prepare the robot pair, he added, making it a “fairly light lift” to deploy the robots in the hallways of the hospital.

A pair of Moxi robots now roam the halls of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Tower as part of an eight-month pilot program at Baptist Health.  Photo by Michele Leivas.
A pair of Moxi robots now roam the halls of the J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Tower as part of an eight-month pilot program at Baptist Health. Photo by Michele Leivas.

“Once we are fully operational and deployed here, Moxi will be fully self-contained in Baptist Jacksonville,” he added. “We’re just getting started and making sure we learn all the doors and elevators; we’ll have one of our colleagues who is here with Moxi to make sure we don’t run into any problems, but in the long run those people will leave and Moxi will be completely self-sufficient.

Moxi has one arm, one gripping hand, and three locked drawers that require hospital ID badges to access. Baptist Health President and CEO Michael A. Mayo said the implementation of Moxi has “multiple meanings” for the hospital.

“Using a robot for point-to-point service delivery allows our staff to focus more on direct patient care, so point-to-point services such as meal delivery, blood delivery from the blood bank or drugs and drugs from the pharmacy eliminates that task and keeps people in unity,” he said. “Secondarily, it creates some excitement in the environment after the long pandemic and… burnout, to have something fun and exciting in the environment.”

Funding for this initiative was made possible by Baptist Health’s Reid Endowment for Technology.

By Michele Leivas
Resident Community News

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