Nestlé expands vegan protein offering with launch of plant-based eggs and shrimp

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Nestlé, the world’s largest food company, has expanded its plant-based offering with the launch of vegan eggs and shrimp. Offered under the Swiss food giant’s Garden Gourmet brand, the new products are part of Nestlé’s goal to focus on health and sustainability by expanding further into the plant protein sector.

The new vegan egg, called Garden Gourmet vEGGie, comes in liquid form and contains soy protein and omega-3 fatty acids. Like conventional eggs, the product can be scrambled, used in pancakes or as an ingredient in baking. Nestlé’s new vegan shrimp, Garden Gourmet Vrimp, is made with a blend of seaweed, peas and konjac root. Nestlé will test the new eggs and shrimp in a limited number of European markets, including Switzerland. The company has yet to announce exactly where the new products will be available.

Nestlé wants to replace animal protein

While Nestlé has engaged in a number of problematic business practices throughout its more than 150 years of activity, the company is betting on plant-based meat as the future of food. It ultimately aims to create a protein of plant origin to “replace all available animal protein,” Nestlé CEO Mark Schneider told a press conference in London. “We’re on to something that’s a major trend over time. “

The company is using its large number of brands and global distribution network to bring more herbal options to consumers around the world. In recent years, Nestlé has expanded its portfolio to include vegan meat, seafood and dairy products. Under its Garden Gourmet brand, Nestlé already offers a variety of herbal products in the retail and foodservice sector, including the Incredible Burger (now “Sensational Burger”) which was presented as part of the of the Big Vegan TS burger at McDonald’s in Germany. Garden Gourmet’s new shrimp joins the brand’s existing vegan tuna product – its first foray into plant-based seafood – which is available in Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and Switzerland.

Earlier this year, Nestlé expanded into the dairy-free milk sector with its pea-based Wunda brand in France, the Netherlands and Portugal, with roll-out to other European markets expected in the months to to come.

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Brand expansion in the United States

In the United States, the Swiss giant owns the vegetarian brand Sweet Earth, under which it offers vegan meats such as the Awesome Burger, Awesome Grounds and vegan cheddar-stuffed sausages, as well as a new iteration of the Awesome Burger. mixed with Benevolent Bacon vegan pieces. Nestlé has also modernized some of its classic brands to include Sweet Earth’s vegan meat products such as DiGiorno pizzas and Stouffer’s lasagna.

Another brand owned by Nestlé Freshly has also launched its first range of fully vegan meals. As part of its new Purely Plant menu, the chef-prepared meal delivery service will feature six options, including hearty burgers, macaroni and cheese and burritos, developed to showcase the nutritional benefits and delicious possibilities of plant-based foods.

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Getting started with cultured meat

In addition to creating new herbal products, the company is also testing the waters for new technologies, such as cultured meat with Israeli startup Future Meat Technologies Ltd. (FMT) which grows real animal meat in a lab from a small amount of animal cells, eliminating the need to raise and slaughter animals for food. Potentially, Nestlé will integrate FMT’s new meat products into its Garden Gourmet brand to provide consumers with a product that blends cultured and plant-based meat.

To find more vegan eggs and seafood read:

This new vegan egg is made from a legume you’ve never heard of

Main Chinese chain Dicos replaces eggs with vegan eggs

Singapore gets a taste of the world’s first lab-grown crab

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